Tag Archives: bulbs

Spring Flowering Bulbs Planted

Today has been such a lovely day that there really was no excuse for not getting out and doing all those autumn jobs that I’ve been putting off for one reason or another.

The grass has been cut so I’m now hoping that the temperature will drop and it’ll stop growing.  Having said that the smell of freshly cut grass is lovely at any time of year.  I’ve cleared some of the fading annuals, sweet peas, some of the Phacelia and Calendula, but left the Nasturtiums as their foliage still looks good!  The summer flowering perennials have all been cut back and the weeds have been cleared too.  

This left me with some space to finally plant out the spring flowering bulbs which have been hiding in a dark cupboard quietly whispering to me for the last few weeks, “plant us, plant us, you won’t regret it!”. 

Come the spring, here’s what I’m looking forward to seeing emerge, Chionodoxa forbesii (Glory of the Snow) which flowers March/May, Iris reticulata (dwarf) flowering February/March and Narcissus ‘Tete-a-tete’ flowering in March.

Chionodoxa forbesii

 

 

 

 

 

Iris reticulata

 

 

 

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-tete’

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s how it looks now.  I’ll be keeping a close eye on this border as I eagerly await the first flowers of 2013.  

Not much to see yet but just wait until Spring!

At some point over winter I’ll be widening this border so that scruffy edge will be history, I might even do it tomorrow if the sun shines!  

Autumn Planting of Onions

Allium cepa ‘Electric’

Today I bought my garlic and onions for Autumn planting all ready to be planted out except we are getting an entire month’s worth of rain in one day today so not even my waterproof trousers are giving me the confidence to brave the weather.

Instead I’ll just note down a few interesting facts about the three different Allium species I’ve chosen.

I have Elephant garlic which is good for roasting and has a sweet, mild flavour.  Elephant garlic’s latin name is Allium ampeloprasum so is not a true garlic but a member of the onion family nonetheless.

I also bought Garlic ‘Marco’, Allium sativum ‘Marco’ which has a distinctive strong flavour and is a good storer.

Garlic needs a free draining fertile soil in full sun.  Before planting the ground should be dug over, removing weeds and adding well rotted compost if needed and a general fertilizer to improve yields.  The bulbs should be broken into individual cloves which are then planted 3cm deep and 10cm apart along the row.  When the leaves start to die back in the following summer the garlic can be lifted and left to dry and ripen on the surface for a few days.

Lastly, I’ve chosen Onion ‘Electric’,  Allium cepa ‘Electric’, an overwintering red onion for early harvest and whose young growth can be used as spring onions.  Apparently it’s very good in salads and stir fries.  Soil preparation is the same as for garlic but they require a distance of 12cm apart in rows that are 30cm apart so a little more room than garlic.  Protection from birds will probably be a good idea as they like to pull them out of the ground.

Now I just need the rain to ease off!